Common Procedures

Total Shoulder Replacement Surgery

Arthritis or injury can also damage the shoulder joint preventing a person from lifting their arm. In severe cases, the only treatment available is shoulder joint replacement surgery. Shoulder replacement surgery has been around since the 1950s and was originally used for severe fractures, but because of its success, it has since been broadened to address arthritis. Today, about 23,000 people in the U.S. have shoulder replacement surgery. Patients with bone-on-bone contact are typically good candidates for shoulder replacement surgery, where an artificial ball and socket joint is installed into the shoulder.

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Shoulder Impingement Surgery

This minimally invasive procedure is often performed on an outpatient basis. Shoulder impingement helps relieve pain by decompressing the small enclosed area around the rotator tendon of the shoulder joint. During the procedure, the bursa is removed and the orthopaedic surgeon trims back the acromion bone to allow for normal pain-free motion. In most cases, this procedure is performed arthroscopically.

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Arthroscopy

Minimally invasive techniques (also known as arthroscopy) and improved tools allow orthopedic surgeons to fix rotator cuff tears usually through 3-4 small incisions, less than ½ inch. The rotator cuff tear is repaired by suturing the torn tendon back to the humerus. Recovery is less painful and scars are less noticeable.


During surgery for a rotator cuff tear, the surgeon removes debris from the damaged shoulder cuff tendon. This is called a debridement and is typically completed arthroscopically. Next, if bone spurs are present, the surgeon will next smooth the acromion area to prevent the acromion from pinching the tendon.